Course Descriptions

IDS 501 ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
The study of international development has undergone important changes in recent decades. First, the emergence of the micro-enterprise phenomenon has radically altered the way many scientists, policy makers, and individuals pursue economic growth. Second, the importance of political development and civil society has taken on new and urgent importance in the Post-9/11 world. Third, the globalization patterns of the IT era have led to different modes of human connectivity and cultural influence.

This course will trace the history of alternative models for economic development, such as export-led development, import substitution, FDI driven development, as well as the Micro-Enterprise model. The course will also examine models for political and civil society development that work in conjunction with economic development, as well as considerations for sustainability and vulnerable populations. Case studies will include diverse examples of political development alongside economic models, including South Korea, Chile, India, China, and beyond (3 credits).

IDS 502 TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN RESOURCES IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Globalization today has been characterized by the information technology (IT) revolution, which has re-defined how humans can cooperate over vast distances. At the same time, many societies have a human resource deficit that is not keeping pace with the rapid advancements in technology. Both in developed and developing nations, technological infrastructure is emphasized in strategies for growth and rejuvenation, but development of human resources is often overlooked as a necessary compliment to these strategies. We see this in “urban renewal” policies in the United States, as well as in “leapfrog” strategies in developing nations.

This course will examine these issues and others related to the effective development of human resources, and how diverse human resource capabilities can fit diverse policy frameworks for technological development in both developed and developing nations (3 credits).

IDS 507 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS
This course will teach varied and prominent methods applied in social science research. Students will be asked to design and execute a pilot study from conception to measurement. This will include selection of a research question and appropriate methodology to study this question. It will further include an analysis of existing literature, the formation of hypotheses, the execution of the method (with an emphasis on primary data collection), and analysis of that data. Students will be encouraged to a) incorporate their field service experiences into the learning process, and b) design a pilot study that could be used for their culminating/thesis project required for earning the MS degree (3 credits).

IDS 508 ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH METHODS
This course will teach students to utilize the world around them as a ready platform for scientific research. Goals of the course will include teaching students a) how to systematize observations in daily life, and social settings they encounter, b) “grounded theory” the process of building concepts out of systematic observations in field settings, and c) how to use ethnographic techniques to augment their understanding of subject matter beyond the specific research questions. Ethnographic research methods will teach students to “contextualize” social phenomena according to the multi-dimensional social influences at their root (3 credits).

IDS 511-514 REFLECTIONS: INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIETY
The Reflections: Institutions and Society courses are a series of 1-credit courses with two primary objectives. Students will use these courses to link their field experiences to conceptual and theoretical knowledge, and each Reflections course will have specific learning objectives to compliment the diverse field settings experienced over each semester.

IDS 511/514 REFLECTIONS: INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIETY
IDS 511/514 will be taken during the first semester of field service in New York City, and students will learn the fundamental principles of institutions as super-structures that cohere social behavior. An additional specific focus for this course will be “The Professions.” Students will learn the fundamental principles, and ethical underpinnings that make “the professions” a distinct category of occupations (1 credit).

IDS 512 REFLECTIONS: INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIETY
IDS 512 will be taken in conjunction with the second semester field service in London, England during the second semester. A key goal of this course will be to examine the role of civil society in a vibrant and multi-cultural democratic society. This will include the role of political institutions and the role of citizens and cultures in social development and well-being (1 credit).

IDS 513 REFLECTIONS: INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIETY
IDS 513 will be taken in conjunction with field service in either Ecuador or Thailand during the third semester. A central learning objective for this course will be to study models for institutional development, and assess the dominance of some institutional power structures over others, depending on the society (1 credit).

IDS 515 ART AND SOCIAL INTERVENTION
The focus of this course is on the use of the universal language of the arts as an interventionist tool. The course will teach the use of arts for assisting at-risk populations (K thru 12, Adult, Senior Citizens and Physically Impaired, etc.) with literacy problems, as well as using art as a method of assessing school curriculums (math, social studies, natural sciences, etc.). Additional curricular benefits will be examined, such as raising attendance levels, and art as a catalyst for improving school culture and “humanizing” institutional environments. A further emphasis of the course will be on using the arts to work with populations with physical impairments, such as visually and hearing impaired (3 credits).

IDS 518 HISTORY AND ETHICS OF INTERNATIONAL SERVICE LEARNING
This course examines the history, current state, and emerging trends of global service-learning. Topics addressed will include historical roots (including an overview of international volunteerism, international education, and international aid and development), current statistics, individual/organizational/ institutional motivations and benefits, effective practices and trends, measurements of impact, and ethical and philosophical issues relevant to modern international service-learning (3 credits).

IDS 545 SERVANT LEADERSHIP
Servant leadership is a distinctive model of leadership that influences professional behavior, organizational collaboration, and personal fulfillment of the servant leader. Students in this course will learn the ethical and professional characteristics of a servant leader. Service to others is a primary requirement for many professional settings. It is an important method of organizational management. It can also be an effective therapeutic technique, as well as an important policy focus. At the conceptual level, three important elements are servant, leader, and servant leader (3 credits).

IDS 560 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SERVICE LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
The Special Topics offering is an invitation to faculty across disciplines to contribute to the program in International Development and Service. This course may be an exceptional course that is only taught one time, or in rare circumstances, or it may ultimately become a regular offering of the program (3 credits).

IDS 601 DISABILITY AS A SOCIAL CONCERN
In the 1960’s, physical impairment began a long transformation from being strictly viewed as a medical concern, to being viewed as a social concern. Over time, this transformation led to the American with Disabilities Act, and now a pending International Treaty. This course will examine that history, as well as examine the basic premise of disability as a social concern; that physical impairment is frequently a disability, only because society refuses to make basic accommodations. Among other objectives of the course, will be to teach students some basic typologies for understanding physical impairment, as well as how viewing disability as a social concern has influenced medical models over time (3 credits).

IDS 607 GRANT WRITING AND FUNDRAISING
Effective grant writing and fundraising is a vital skill for anyone wishing to thrive in non-profit organizational management. Further, grant writing demonstrates a wide ranging set of skills ranging from conceptualization to policy implementation. The successful grant writer must know the field, understand best practice, have strategic planning skills, and know how to implement successful programmatic growth. This course will require students to develop grants for their own ideas, or for one of the partners with whom they work in the field. Alternatively, they can design a fundraising campaign for their own ideas, or one of their partners (3 credits).

IDS 624 COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PROJECT
This course is designed to provide support to students completing their Culminating Project, a requirement for the M.S. degree in International Development and Service. The Culminating Project is the final requirement for completing the IPSL-CMSV Master’s degree. This course will be offered each fall and spring term to help students design, develop, and present their comprehensive project.

Additional Course Descriptions at the College of Mount Saint Vincent

The College of Mount Saint Vincent offers graduate coursework in Nursing, Business and Management, and Urban and Multicultural Education. Many of these courses emphasize service as well as organizational finance, structure and decision making in the non-profit sector. Students are encouraged to target a recommended list of these courses, in consolation with their faculty advisor.

Course Descriptions at Overseas Sites

All overseas sites will have a recommended list of classes for selection to be determined by the student and faculty advisor. However, information about all graduate offerings can be obtained at the following sites: