Course Descriptions

IDS 511-513 REFLECTIONS: PERSPECTIVES AND PRACTICE
The Reflections: Perspectives and Practice courses are a series of three 2-credit advisory courses that help students develop their field of scholarly and professional expertise. Students will use these courses to link their field service experiences to conceptual and theoretical work, and each Reflections course will advise students toward the thesis project and ultimately toward their professional goals.

During the first semester, the Reflections course brings together a new cohort with a faculty supervisor for weekly meetings. The second and third semesters Reflections courses are conducted remotely – students work with their faculty advisor together via email or Skype to continue their academic and professional development and to integrate coursework, service, and research into a powerful area of expertise. There is no Reflections course in the fourth semester because students will work with their advisors weekly on a Masters thesis in the 3-credit Comprehensive Project course. (2 credits)

IDS 501 ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
The study of international development has undergone important changes in recent decades. First, the emergence of the micro-enterprise phenomenon has radically altered the way many scientists, policy makers, and individuals pursue economic growth. Second, the importance of political development and civil society has taken on new and urgent importance in the Post-9/11 world. Third, the globalization patterns of the IT era have led to different modes of human connectivity and cultural influence.

This course will trace the history of alternative models for economic development, such as export-led development, import substitution, FDI driven development, as well as the micro-enterprise model. The course will also examine models for political and civil society development that work in conjunction with economic development, as well as considerations for sustainability and vulnerable populations. Case studies will include diverse examples of political development alongside economic models, including South Korea, Chile, India, China, and beyond (3 credits).

IDS 507 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS
This course will teach varied and prominent methods applied in social science research. Students will be asked to design and execute a pilot study from conception to measurement. This will include selection of a research question and appropriate methodology to study this question. It will further include an analysis of existing literature, the formation of hypotheses, the execution of the method (with an emphasis on primary data collection), and analysis of that data. Students will be encouraged to incorporate their field service experiences into the learning process and design a pilot study that could be used for their culminating/thesis project required for earning the M.S. degree (3 credits).

IDS 620 ANTI-POVERTY WORK IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD
This course examines poverty on a global level with an understanding of the structural and systemic factors that create systems of poverty. The focus will be on the details that surround the lives of the poor and the ways in which these are linked to larger structural processes. Through course readings and assignments, participants will identify and evaluate international programs that have been developed to alleviate and address the structural and individual correlates of poverty with an emphasis on identifying the most effective practical anti-poverty interventions. (3 credits)

IDS 630 BUILDING AND SUSTAINING A COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION
The course provides an overview of the history of community organizing while exploring the components necessary to develop and sustain a community organization. The course will have a special focus on the impact of community organizing in Bronx neighborhoods from the 1970’s through the present. The course will discuss leadership and issue development; organizational structure and fundraising basics including proposal writing; and developing and utilizing research in community organizing and community development work. The course will schedule at least one off-campus visit to sites in the City to meet leaders in the community development field. (3 credits)

IDS 624 COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PROJECT
This course is designed to provide support to students completing their Culminating Project, a requirement for the M.S. degree in International Development and Service. The Culminating Project is the final requirement for completing the College of Mount Saint Vincent’s Master’s degree. This course will be offered each fall and spring term to help students design, develop, and present their comprehensive project. (3 credits)

Elective Courses

IDS 502 TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN RESOURCES IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Globalization today has been characterized by the information technology (IT) revolution, which has re-defined how humans can cooperate over vast distances. At the same time, many societies have a human resource deficit that is not keeping pace with the rapid advancements in technology. Both in developed and developing nations, technological infrastructure is emphasized in strategies for growth and rejuvenation, but development of human resources is often overlooked as a necessary compliment to these strategies. We see this in “urban renewal” policies in the United States, as well as in “leapfrog” strategies in developing nations.

This course will examine these issues and others related to the effective development of human resources, and how diverse human resource capabilities can fit diverse policy frameworks for technological development in both developed and developing nations (3 credits).

IDS 508 ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH METHODS
This course will teach students to utilize the world around them as a ready platform for scientific research. Goals of the course will include teaching students how to systematize observations in daily life, and social settings they encounter, “grounded theory” the process of building concepts out of systematic observations in field settings, and how to use ethnographic techniques to augment their understanding of subject matter beyond the specific research questions. Ethnographic research methods will teach students to “contextualize” social phenomena according to the multi-dimensional social influences at their root (3 credits).

IDS 515 ART AND SOCIAL INTERVENTION
The focus of this course is on the use of the universal language of the arts as an interventionist tool. The course will teach the use of arts for assisting at-risk populations (K thru 12, Adult, Senior Citizens and Physically Impaired, etc.) with literacy problems, as well as using art as a method of assessing school curriculum (math, social studies, natural sciences, etc.). Additional curricular benefits will be examined, such as raising attendance levels, and art as a catalyst for improving school culture and “humanizing” institutional environments. A further emphasis of the course will be on using the arts to work with populations with physical impairments, such as visually and hearing impaired (3 credits).

IDS 545 SERVANT LEADERSHIP
Servant leadership is a distinctive model of leadership that influences professional behavior, organizational collaboration, and personal fulfillment of the servant leader. Students in this course will learn the ethical and professional characteristics of a servant leader. Service to others is a primary requirement for many professional settings. It is an important method of organizational management. It can also be an effective therapeutic technique, as well as an important policy focus. At the conceptual level, three important elements are servant, leader, and servant leader (3 credits).

IDS 560 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SERVICE LEADERSHIP AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
The Special Topics offering is an invitation to faculty across disciplines to contribute to the program in International Development and Service. This course may be an exceptional course that is only taught one time, or in rare circumstances, or it may ultimately become a regular offering of the program (3 credits).

IDS 607 GRANT WRITING AND FUNDRAISING
Effective grant writing and fundraising is a vital skill for anyone wishing to thrive in non-profit organizational management. Further, grant writing demonstrates a wide ranging set of skills ranging from conceptualization to policy implementation. The successful grant writer must know the field, understand best practice, have strategic planning skills, and know how to implement successful programmatic growth. This course will require students to develop grants for their own ideas, or for one of the partners with whom they work in the field. Alternatively, they can design a fundraising campaign for their own ideas, or one of their partners (3 credits).

MBA/IDS Courses

Many courses in the MBA program are cross-listed with the IDS offerings, so that IDS students can take courses in nonprofit management, leadership, and fundraising. These offerings include:

MBA 691 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT
As the general foundation course for the nonprofit concentration, this course focuses on management and administrative issues relating to nonprofit organization. Administrative structure and other subjects related to the difference between nonprofit and for-profit organizations will be addressed. Subjects covered include constituencies, boards, strategic planning, marketing, financial management, human resources, volunteer management, and resource development.

This course is designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the most important management issues in the nonprofit sector and to provide the student with a firm foundation in nonprofit administrative concepts and theories. The student will learn to appreciate the difference between the for-profit and nonprofit organization and related management techniques and issues specific to the nonprofit organization as compared to the for-profit or public sector (3 credits).

MBA 692 FUNDRAISING AND INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a variety of fund raising methods, provide the context in which these methods might be used, and provide an understanding of how fund raising operates within public and not-for-profit organizations. The course is directed at students pursuing a management career in the not-for-profit section as well as other graduate students interested in fund raising within public and nonprofit organizations (3 credits).

MBA 693 ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
With the increase in the sense of social responsibility in society has come a corresponding increase in the number of nonprofit organizations and in the volume of their activities. Approximately one third of the volume of business in the United States is conducted by governmental units and charitable organizations. As such organizations play an increasingly significant role, accounting for these organizations is receiving more and more attention. For example, a Governmental Accounting standards Board (GASB), similar to the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), has been proposed. This body would be responsible for establishing accounting standards for state and local governmental units. Accounting for other nonprofit organizations, such as churches and hospitals, is also receiving attention by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and other professional accounting groups.

The accounting systems for all nonprofit organizations must provide financial data to internal management for use in planning and controlling operations, and to external parties, such as taxpayers and donors, for use in determining the effectiveness of operations. Thus, the focus of this course is both management control and financial accounting for nonprofit organizations (3 credits).

MBA 694 THE LAW AND GOVERNANCE OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
This course is designed to provide an overview of governance issues as well as basic contract, labor, and tax law issues within the area of nonprofit corporation law. Ethics in nonprofits is included with specific emphasis directed towards self-dealing, fiduciary responsibility, and human resource management. Legal issues covered include a variety of legal problems that nonprofit executive directors or their staff are likely to face, including board organization and management problems (3 credits).

MBA 695 MARKETING FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Nonprofit marketing has become a major, legitimate field of study. Today, nonprofit organizations actively employ marketing techniques, including advertising, personal selling, public relations, and product design to reach their goals.

This course is designed to study the marketing strategies used by organizations in education, the arts, social services, libraries, and public services. Through case studies and practical examples the student will be introduced to the special needs of the nonprofit sector and the process for solving marketing problems, as well as the tools and techniques to make effective marketing decisions in specific areas (3 credits).

MBA 697 SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SUSTAINABILITY
This course explores social entrepreneurship by investigating such questions as: Who are social entrepreneurs? How does social entrepreneurship differ from traditional business entrepreneurship? Can the impact of social entrepreneurship be assessed? In exploring these issues, two foundational elements emerge as critical components in a working understanding of the nature of social entrepreneurship in today’s society: who are social entrepreneurs, and what does it take to be successful? (3 credits)