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Course Descriptions

Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT 205 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
This course is an introduction to the financial accounting process: measuring, processing, interpreting and using accounting information for business decision-making. It examines the principles and methods of financing business organizations and evaluating internal control problems. It discusses the concepts and analytical techniques applicable to identifying and solving financial management problems (3 credits).

ACCT 207 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 
This course examines the process of identification, measurement, accumulation, analysis, preparation, interpretation, and communication of financial information used by management to plan, evaluate, and control within an organization, and to assure appropriate use of and accountability for its resources. The course introduces the student to the preparation of financial reports for non-managerial groups such as shareholders, creditors, regulatory agencies, and tax authorities (3 credits).

ACCT 313 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
This course is an in-depth study of financial accounting principles and recording procedures. It includes the evaluation and preparation of financial statements including the statements of income and retained earnings, and the balance sheet. It covers the analysis of financial statement components, issues of valuation and form (3 credits).

Prerequisite: ACCT 205

ACCT 314 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
This course is an in-depth study of accounting procedures and systems related to a firm’s financial structure and the issuing and evaluation of corporate securities. It examines the more detailed aspects of the firm’s income statement such as earnings per share and its presentation to the firm’s income statement, the preparation of cash flow statements, and the analysis of financial statements (3 credits).

Prerequisite: ACCT 313

ACCT 411 INCOME TAXATION
This course is concerned with theory and problems of federal income taxes as applied to individuals and corporations. It examines the fundamental concepts of the federal income taxation stature. More specifically, it focuses on the U.S. internal revenue code for individuals, and how lawyers and legal institutions have interpreted the statute over time (3 credits).

Prerequisite: ACCT 205

ACCT 412 COST ACCOUNTING
This course examines how managerial accounting information is utilized within an organization for planning, control, motivation, and decision-making. It focuses on cost information: the accumulation of costs within organizations, the use of costs for planning and control, cost allocation, and the identification of relevant costs for decision-making. It examines various cost accounting systems, including job, prices and standard cost systems and budgeting techniques (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ACCT 205, 207

ACCT 450 AUDITING THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of auditing: planning an audit, gathering evidence, testing internal controls and account balances, audit sampling, creation of audit work papers and audit reports. It provides practical experience using computer-assisted audit techniques and examines the ethical conduct and liability of auditors (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ACCT 313, 314

ACCT 451 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
This course reviews the complete accounting cycle learned in basic accounting. The course deals with specialized topics associated with the work of an accountant. They include: uncollectible accounts, the handling of plant assets, promissory notes, deferrals and accruals, and accounting control systems. It also introduces techniques used in the interpretation of financial statements and trends in the financial statements of firms which are not always readily available from financial statements (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ACCT 313, 314

ACCT 460 ACCOUNTING RESEARCH
This course introduces students to research of current issues in accounting using various online databases. Special emphasis is placed on research techniques using the Financial Accounting Research System (FARS) database, and those of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the International Accounting Standards Board. The course prepares students for the new computerized format of the uniform CPA examination (3 credits).

Prerequisites: 90 credits of coursework, including ACCT 313, 314, 412, 451

ACCT 475 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP
The internship offers students the opportunity to apply accounting theory and concepts in the actual workplace (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ACCT 313, 314

Business (BUSN)

BUSN 105 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (C)*
This is a course in management designed as part of the College’s Core curriculum. It is an introduction to the principles of business management: planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling of businesses. The course combines the traditional management process approach with contemporary systems and behavioral approaches (3 credits).

BUSN 106 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (C)*
This is a course in marketing designed as part of the College’s Core Curriculum. The course is a study of the basic principles and concepts in the marketing process, the techniques of market research, and the function of advertising in business operations, the role it plays in the economy, as well as a consideration of the sociological and ethical aspects of current practices (3 credits).

BUSN 110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ANALYTICS
This course is an introduction to the concepts and applications of business analytics. Most companies today collect an overwhelming amount of data. Business is increasingly using data analytics to understand, interpret, and manage their business operations. This course covers how to analyze, summarize, and visually communicate information included in databases. This course provides students with an analytical toolset that enables them to address data-driven business problems. The course features case studies and hands-on approaches to demonstrate the analytics concepts and techniques used in the business world.

BUSN 210 INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the student to the scope and breadth of the sports industry, and analyzes the management strategies required of a sports business professional. It explores the history of sports management and explains how economic, technological and legal factors have changed the industry from a recreation-based activity to one of the largest revenue-generating sectors in the United States and the world (3 credits).
Prerequisite: BUSN 105

BUSN 211 SPORTS MARKETING AND CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
This course is an application of marketing principles and concepts in the sports industry. Topics include historical trends and the evolution of sponsorship marketing, current sponsorship programs and trends, media and sponsorship, sales materials development and creation, sponsorship sales strategies and tactics, program servicing and retention strategies, strategies to guide corporate sponsorships, and program measurement and evaluation (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 106

BUSN 240 INTRODUCTION TO UNITED STATES HEALTH CARE POLICY AND SYSTEMS
This course introduces students to the historical development, structure, policy, operation, and current and future directions of the major components of the American health care delivery system. It examines the ways in which health care services are organized and delivered, the influences that impact health care public policy decisions, factors that determine the allocation of health care resources and the establishment of priorities, and the relationship of health care costs to measurable benefits (3 credits).

BUSN 250 HEALTHCARE MARKETING
This course introduces the student to healthcare marketing field. Healthcare has not only come of age; it has also risen to a new level of prominence. Increased competition has driven healthcare providers (HCP) to better understand the market in which they operate, their customers, their patients and their customers’ motivations. Marketing is now a recognized and established function in many healthcare organizations (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 106, 240

BUSN 300 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS
Business and econometric modeling techniques are examined through the use of Windows-based microcomputer spreadsheet construction and analysis. Emphasis is placed upon practical application in the business environment. Topics include inventory simulation, capital budgeting, decision analysis, break-even analysis, database management and record keeping, and single and multiple linear regression analysis (3 credits).

Prerequisite: MATH 102, 119

BUSN 301 BUSINESS LAW I
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, terminology, and principles of the American legal system. Topics include: civil dispute resolution, constitutional law, administrative law, criminal law, intentional torts, negligence, introduction to contracts, mutual assent, illegal bargains, contract in writing, contract remedies, performance, breach and discharge (3 credits).

BUSN 302 BUSINESS LAW II
This course is an overview of commercial law with emphasis on the law of contracts, sales, property, partnerships and corporations, commercial paper, secured transactions, bankruptcy and protection of intellectual property (3 credits).

BUSN 303 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS I
This course is a survey of computer information systems and how they relate to administration and management in the modern business organization. Topics include choosing the right system for the office environment, site selection and preparation, types of software and their applications, integration of hardware and software, networking techniques and theory, centralized versus decentralized and networked information systems, network topologies, information location and retrieval through the Internet and the World Wide Web, message exchanging through email, message privacy techniques incorporating public key/private key encryption, and emerging trends in information systems (3 credits).

Prerequisites: MATH 102

BUSN 307 MARKETING MANAGEMENT
This course is an overview of current strategic planning process used by marketing managers, such as sales promotion and publicity decisions, product-line strategies, marketing organization and distribution-channel developments (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 106

BUSN 309 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (WE)*
This course explores the major theories and applications that explain international business transactions and the institutions influencing those activities. It studies the social, cultural, political and regulatory environments within which international business transactions take place; the foreign exchange systems which facilitate or constrain such transactions; and the dynamics of international business government relationships (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ACCT 105, BUSN 106, ECON 220, ECON 230, BUSN 317

BUSN 316 OPERATIONS: METHODS AND SYSTEMS
This course is a survey of frequently used stochastic and deterministic quantitative methodologies used in the management of business organizations and the allocation of scarce resources. Topics and applications include linear programming with graphical and simplex solving, transportation, transshipment, assignment, network models, project management techniques, inventory theory, simulation, queuing, forecasting, and decision theory. Computer-based software tools for management decision-making are integral to the course (3 credits).

Prerequisites: MATH 102, 119

BUSN 317 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, practices, terminologies, and theories of financial management. It provides an overview of financial management as central to the operation of a business enterprise: planning the firm’s needs for funds, selecting the least costly source and allocating their use to maximize value of owner’s investment. Topics include: ratio analysis of financial statements, yield curves and rates of return, and the measurement of the risk of financial assets (3 credits).

Prerequisite: ACCT 205

BUSN 318 HUMAN RESOURCE STRATEGY
This course is an examination of the principles of personnel administration and processes of recruitment, placement, development, evaluation, compensation, and effective utilization of the firm’s human resources. Case studies are utilized (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 105

BUSN 322 SPORTS EVENT PRODUCTION AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT
This course explores major event preparation and planning in the sports industry. The course discusses techniques for selecting and evaluating particular sites as well as techniques for forecasting demand and supply in specific markets. Topics include the integrated development process of public and sports-specific arena/stadiums/sites; sources of funding; types of development including nonprofit sponsorships; partnerships; organizational development including volunteer staffing; factors influencing success; and potential local obstacles (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 210

BUSN 340 HOSPITAL AND HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
This course is an introduction to managing healthcare organizations in the United States. Topics covered will include tasks, education, roles, and values of health services managers in various settings; control; organization design; and professional integration, adaptation, and accountability. Students will develop an understanding of the terminology and basic concepts required for a successful career as a health professional, administrator, policy analyst or researcher. Ultimately, this introductory case-based course will provide students with a broad base of knowledge from which to effectively pursue advanced coursework and professional interests in health policy and administration (3 credits).

Prerequisites: BUSN 105, 240

BUSN 371 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
An understanding of the application of social media marketing theories, concepts, and practices as they relate to the management of the marketing function in a complex organization. Emphasis will be on the managerial aspects of social media marketing plans, including analysis of the external environment. A key element of the course will include the relationship of the “marketing mix” to strategic planning for the social media application (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 106

BUSN 400 BUSINESS STRATEGY (WE)*
This is a capstone course for seniors in the business program. The course provides a framework for problem identification and strategy formation within organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay of judgment and decision making, the use of both qualitative and quantitative factors in policy formulation and execution and the impact of social and moral values. The course provides an opportunity for students to integrate and apply previously acquired knowledge in the areas of accounting, economics, finance, marketing, and management. Utilizes the case approach as well as readings from other disciplines (3 credits).

BUSN 401 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
This course is a study of global political and economic relations, including the place of the United States in the world economy. It explores the interconnectedness between the economic and political factors that have given shape to the current global economy. The issues are discussed in historical perspective, highlighting the major theories that have been developed. Some of the issues examined relate to global security, trade protectionism, international finance, economic and political integration, transnational corporations, the political economy of oil, and global poverty (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ECON 220, 230

BUSN 402 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (with Java)
This course introduces syntax, principles, and practices for object-oriented programming with java. Concentration is on single machine programming. Topics include: java syntax; the idea of object-oriented programming; the java libraries; multi-media programming, data, structures, loops and algorithms; and user-interface development (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 303

BUSN 403 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS II
Introduces the principles and practices for the system life-cycle phases of elaboration, construction, transition and production, focusing on the dimensions of analysis/design, programming and quality management. Topics include: going from the application model to a conceptual system model, using semantic analysis, type packages, class and role diagrams, and dynamic effectuation models; developing standards and tests for the systems and its components; implementing the system design, final testing, deployment and training (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 303

BUSN 404 MULTI-USER SYSTEMS
This course examines the essentials of multi-user information systems as used by business organizations. Topics include: client-server operating systems, multi-tier physical and logical architectures, design and programming for multi-user systems, multi-user databases with use of a SQL-compliant database, system administration and server-side design and programming for web applications (3 credits).

Prerequisites: BUSN 303, 402

BUSN 405 CORPORATE FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
This is a second course in financial theory, this course examines problems, procedures, and concepts utilized in managing the assets and liabilities of the corporation. Emphasizing analytical approaches and financial theory, the topics covered include: control of the firm’s financial structure, capital budgeting, risk analysis, the theory of valuation for corporate securities, dividend policies and long-term financing options (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 317

BUSN 406 INVESTMENTS
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles, tools and techniques of investing. It examines asset allocation decisions, the portfolio management process, security market indexes, security valuation, and evaluation of portfolio performance. The course provides a hands-on experience in the use and analysis of various types of investment information (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 317

BUSN 407 CAPITAL AND MONEY MARKETS
This course is analysis of the role of financial institutions and financial markets in the U.S. economy. Emphasizing theoretical concepts and policy considerations, topics covered include: investment theory, analysis and management of common stock and bonds, and derivative security analysis. The course provides a hands-on experience in the use and analysis of various types of investment information (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ECON 230

BUSN 408 LABOR RELATIONS AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
This course is a study of the issues and problems facing management in its relations with organized labor; techniques of collective bargaining; types of union agreements; and current trends in management labor relations (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 105

BUSN 409 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
This course is a study of international marketing operations, including decision-making and policy formation. Special problems involved in directing the flow of a company’s goods and services to consumers or users in more than one country (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 106

BUSN 410 SERVICES MARKETING
This course is a study of the specific marketing needs of the service sector, including an investigation of its unique nature, emerging theories for service marketing, and applicable management strategies being developed for a variety of service industries (3 credits).

Prerequisite: BUSN 106

BUSN 413 FINANCIAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course examines the essentials of the major types of financial information systems, including systems for accounting and back office, audit and compliance, forecasting and valuation, budget and planning, risk management, trading, portfolio and loan management, sales and marketing, and e-commerce. The course examines the related issues of transactions-based systems, globalization considerations, and enterprise resource planning systems (3 credits).

Prerequisites: BUSN 303, MATH 119, ACCT 205

BUSN 419/ECON 419 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international business finance. It discusses the global environment which a multinational corporation faces in the management of the finance function. The major topics include: the international monetary system, the balance of payments, foreign exchange, the management of foreign exchange risk, and country risk analysis. It also examines the foreign investment decision process, the major theories of foreign investment, the role of international banks, and the financing of international business operations through public and private non-bank financial institutions (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ECON 220, 230

BUSN 420 ADVANCED SPORTS BUSINESS STRATEGIES
This is a capstone course for the sports management area of concentration. It aims to tie all the elements and principles studied in the all the other courses in sports business. Although the specific topics, emphases, and case studies may vary from term to term, the course seeks to impart a mastery and understanding of the structure and operation of sports organizations and their place in the national business landscape, specifically through analysis and evaluation of the essential foundations of the industry: labor, agencies and representation, customer and client development, finance and accounting, facility management and operation, new revenue opportunities, and the media (including television and the Internet). Finally, it considers corporate America’s connection to sports through sponsorships and marketing, endorsements and licensing (3 credits).

Prerequisites: BUSN 210, 211

BUSN 440 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
This course is an introduction to the management of a health care organization’s finances, including the operation of its financial accounting system. Evaluation of the organization’s financial situation using financial techniques and financial statements, cash management, credit analysis, capital structure and capital budgeting, funds management, value analysis and financial control (3 credits).

Prerequisites: BUSN 105, 240

BUSN 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

BUSN 470, 370 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS
This course is an in-depth investigation of an advanced topic in the field of business based on the interests of upper level majors and faculty members in the Department. Detailed course descriptions will be available in the Department at the time of registration (3 credits).

BUSN 475, 375 INTERNSHIPS (3 credits)

CYS I INTRODUCTION TO CYBER SECURITY
In today’s world, no one is safe from cyber-attacks, but everyone can be prepared. This course will teach you how malicious actors use social skills and technology to facilitate cyber attacks and provide you with the tools and information you need to defend against those attacks. Whether you pursue one of the many available jobs in cybersecurity or just want to secure your own privacy, you’ll learn how to make the Internet safer. This online class has optional live sessions (3 credits).

CYS II CYBERCRIME AND GOVERNANCE
Cybercrime is one of the biggest threats companies face on a daily basis, and they are constantly looking for new hires to help protect them. In this course, you will get a firsthand look at the methods used to commit cybercrimes. You will also learn how governments detect, investigate, and stop these crimes, and become familiar with the laws and policies in place to deter cybercriminals. This online class has optional live sessions (3 credits).

CYS III MODERN CYBERSECURITY
Just as technology is constantly evolving, so too must cybersecurity to keep pace with changing trends. In this class, you will learn about the changing landscape of cybersecurity, emerging technologies that are likely to be targeted, and new forms of cyber-attack being launched. By the end of the course, you will be able to implement the most up-to-date practices in cybersecurity in order to protect against attacks. This online class has optional live sessions.

DAM II FOUNDATIONS OF DATA ANALYTICS
Foundations of Data Analytics II is based on UC Berkeley’s Data 8 class. In an increasingly data-driven world, everyone should be able to understand the numbers that govern so much of our lives. Students will learn the core concepts of inference, data analysis and computing by working with real economic, social and geographic data. This course will also provide students with an introduction to the applications of Data Analytics in the workforce, with specific attention paid to the role of the Data Scientist or Analyst, and to the application of Big Data (3 credits).

DMC III SEARCH ENGINE ORGANIZATION (SEO) and SEARCH ENGINE MARKETING (SEM)
How do you find what you’re looking for on the internet? Chances are you turn to google or another search engine. Companies use Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Search Engine Marketing (SEM) to make sure you see them first every time you turn to a search engine. By the end of this course you’ll learn how to optimize a website so that it shows up first on a search, and how to build search ads that will drive customers to your website (3 credits).

DMC IV DIGITAL MARKETING ANALYTICS
Marketing professionals today have access to incredible amounts of data. The ability to use this data is what differentiates successful marketing efforts from failed ones. This course will teach you how to analyze digital customer behavior data using a range of tools, and use that data to test marketing hypothesis and improve customer acquisition. This online class has optional live sessions.

Economics (ECON)

ECON 220 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (C)*
The course introduces the student to the basic economic principles and analytical techniques that are necessary to understand how the market economy functions and what market efficiency means. It explains why the government intervenes and how such intervention affects the market. It focuses on the study of the behavior of individual economic units, which include consumers, investors, business firms, workers, and other entities that play a role in the functioning of the economy. The course examines how and why these units make economic decisions, and how they interact to form larger units — markets and industries. As an introductory course, it is designed to equip the students with the basic tools of economic analysis that will help them understand better the world we live in (3 credits).

Prerequisites: MATH 102 

ECON 230 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (C)*
This is a course in economics designed as part of the College’s Core Curriculum. This course examines the fundamental principles that govern the workings of the overall economy. It covers topics such as demand and supply analysis, national income accounting, economic growth, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policies, as well as an introduction to international trade and exchange rate markets. It also explores various contemporary economic policy issues. The course is designed for both Business and Economics majors/minors and non-majors, and fulfills the social science requirement in the core curriculum (3 credits).

ECON 304 INTERMEDIATE PRICE ANALYSIS
The course builds on the foundation of microeconomic principles and provides an in-depth coverage of the theoretical and empirical aspects of microeconomics. It examines in detail the price mechanism, market structures, and market outcomes. The focus is on the application of microeconomic theories (3 credits).

Prerequisites: MATH 119, ECON 220, 230

ECON 305 MONEY AND BANKING
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the monetary system of the United States, the principles of central banking, and the conduct of monetary policy. The course also covers the essentials of financial markets and financial institutions (3 credits).

Prerequisite: ECON 230

ECON 306 INTERMEDIATE INCOME AND EMPLOYMENT THEORY
The course builds on the foundation of macroeconomic principles and provides an in-depth coverage of the theoretical and empirical aspects of macroeconomics. The economic models of national income, unemployment, inflation, growth, and business cycles are discussed. The emphasis is on the application of theory to the analysis of real macroeconomic issues (3 credits).

Prerequisites: MATH 119, ECON 220, 230

ECON 336 INTERNATIONAL TRADE
This course examines the theoretical principles that govern international trade and explores the empirical evidence of patterns in world trade and the trade policies of industrial, developing, and emerging economies. A focal point of discussion is the role of the United States in the international trading system. The course complements many of the topics discussed in international finance and international business courses. Topics covered include theory of international trade, public and private barriers to trade, economic integration, and international trade institutions (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ECON 220, 230

ECON 375 ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP I
An on-the-job, career-oriented experience enhances a student’s learning and is a valuable supplement to classroom instruction. The internship provides a practical experience in a structured employment environment and is designed to expand on the learning experience and to integrate and reinforce skills and concepts learned in the classroom. It is a three-credit course and admission is limited to students who have completed at least 60 hours of coursework. Prior approval of the economics internship supervisor, the Department chair and the Director of the Oxley Integrated Advising Program are required before the internship is started. (3 credits).

ECON 405 LABOR ECONOMICS
This course examines the theoretical developments in the study of labor markets and the empirical research on such topics as the changing roles of men and women in the contemporary economy, the allocation of time between household and the labor market, differences in occupations and earnings, and policies affecting paid work and family. Discussions also include recent developments in the labor market and their impact on women and men, discrimination in the labor market, and gender differences within and among countries (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ECON 220, 230

ECON 408 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
This course is an application of macroeconomic theory to the solution of business problems. The integration of management and economics emphasizes the analysis of internal business procedures and alternative decision-making in such areas as pricing and allocation of resources. Case studies are utilized (3 credits).

Prerequisites: ECON 220, 230

ECON 409 PUBLIC FINANCE
This course provides an introduction to the theoretical and empirical tools of public finance and budget analysis. Discussions cover topics such as: externalities and public goods; cost-benefit analysis; federal, state and local expenditures; social insurance, income redistribution, and welfare programs (3 credits).

Prerequisite: ECON 220, ECON 230

ECON 460 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

ECON 470, 370 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3 credits)

ECON 475 ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP II
An on-the-job, career-oriented experience enhances a student’s learning and is a valuable supplement to classroom instruction. The internship provides a practical experience in a structured employment environment and is designed to expand on the learning experience and to integrate and reinforce skills and concepts learned in the classroom. A three-credit course, admission is limited to students who have completed at least 90 hours of coursework. Prior approval of the economics internship supervisor, the Department Chair, and the Director for the Oxley Integrated Advising Program are required before the internship is started (3 credits).

MSM 601 MANAGING RISKS AND INTERNAL PROCESSES
This course examines information technology related business risk management and the methodology that includes risk identification, evaluation, and response. The course describes the principles of information technology risk management, the responsibilities and accountability for information technology risk, how to build risk awareness, and how to communicate risk scenarios, business impact, and key risk indicators. Included in the course is the opportunity to create a business focused, process oriented, and measurement driven risk response plan. This course provides a solid foundation for identifying and managing risks through an established process which incorporates cross functional disciplines as well as the design and implementation of efficient but effective internal controls. The course will address all five components of the COSO Framework for evaluating internal controls, namely: the control environment, risk assessment, control activities, information and communication, and ongoing monitoring activities. The skills acquired in this course will enable students to assist businesses in identifying and mitigating critical risks (3 credits).

MSM 604 DATA ANALYTICS: ENHANCING BUSINESS INSIGHT & REPORTING
The course is an introduction to business analytics—it covers managerial statistical tools in descriptive analytics and predictive analytics, including regression. Other topics covered include forecasting, risk analysis, simulation, data mining, and decision analysis. This course provides students with the fundamental concepts and tools needed to understand the emerging role of business analytics in organizations, shows students how to apply basic business analytics tools in a spreadsheet environment, and how to communicate with analytics professionals to effectively use and interpret analytic models and results for making better business decision. Emphasis is placed on applications, concepts, and interpretation of results, rather than theory and calculations. Students use a computer software package for data analysis (3 credits).

MSM 605 FORENSIC ACCOUNTING: USE OF DATA ANALYTICS & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
This course provides a solid foundation for building skills in forensic accounting techniques, including gathering, interpreting, and documenting evidence using Artificial Intelligence (AI), Data Analytics (DA), and Robotic Process Automation (RPA). Students examine the investigative techniques used by accountants to conduct forensic examinations as well as the common schemes and techniques used to all five components of the COSO Framework for evaluating internal controls, namely: the control environment, risk assessment, control activities, information and communication, and ongoing monitoring activities. The skills acquired in this course will enable students to assist businesses in detecting, investigating, documenting, and preventing fraud through the use of audit software to analyze data, trends and anomalies, use of Forensic Accounting tools, and techniques to review detail transactions to identify control weaknesses and potentially fraudulent activities, application of IT general computer, and application controls to prevent control weaknesses and mitigate risk, introduction and application of auditing technology (e.g., Data Analytics/Visualization, RPA, AI and Blockchain), and use of system risk monitoring processes and tools. The course also introduces the many professional opportunities available to forensic accountants. Students enrolling in this graduate course should have a thorough understanding of the business transaction cycle and, at a minimum, a background in both financial accounting and auditing, obtained through either prior coursework or professional experience (3 credits).

MSM 607 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS
Professionals in the business world are often required to perform an in-depth financial review and analysis of a company’s financial statements. Independent study allows the student to explore a topic of interest under the close supervision of a faculty member. The course will include directed readings, applied work, and performing a financial analysis of a company, including: trend analysis, fluctuation analysis, and ratio analysis. This project will require the student to review all financial information available for the company to be found in the 10K, Annual Report, Stock Market Company, and Industry Research Reports, as well as news releases and other information to be found on their website and other SEC Reports. Eventually, in this course, students have the opportunity to review, grasp, and learn the advanced tools such as various models on financial distress and earning manipulation prediction (3 credits).

(C)* May be taken to meet Core Requirements
(WE)* Writing Emphasis