CMSV 601 Drug and Alcohol Policy

Policy Name: Drug and Alcohol Policy

Learn more about the Alcohol and Drug Policy.

Alcohol Policy
The College of Mount Saint Vincent seeks to uphold all local, state, and federal statutes regarding the use, sale, service, or manufacturer of alcohol. Students under the age of 21 are not permitted to possess, purchase, or sell—nor are they at any time permitted to consume—alcoholic beverages on College property or at College sponsored events. Students 21 years of age and older are legally permitted to purchase alcohol and to consume alcohol in areas designated for this use. Use of alcoholic beverages and possession of open containers of alcohol are prohibited in all public areas of campus buildings and campus grounds, unless expressly approved by a professional member of the Office of Student Activities, Leadership, and Commuter Life, in conjunction with the Dean of Students, or the senior administrator of a respective division of the College.

Standard of Conduct
No alcohol is permitted inside the residence halls where the majority of the residents are under the age of 21.

Resident Students | Alcohol Policy
Resident students 21 years of age and over are permitted to possess and consume alcohol in the privacy of their rooms as long as no one under 21 is present in the room. Kegs and beer balls are not permitted in residence halls. Visitors to campus who, in the judgment of campus safety and security, or administrative staff, appear to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs and exhibit behavior that represents a threat to the safety or well-being of the College community, may be banned from the campus or any facility thereof.

Drug Policy

Standard of Conduct
Any possession, use, sale, manufacturer, or distribution of illegal or controlled substances on College of Mount Saint Vincent property is considered to be a violation of this policy. Likewise, students who are knowingly present where illegal substances are kept or deposited, or who are in the company of any person knowing said person is in possession of illegal or controlled substances or drug paraphernalia, are also in violation of this policy.

The College maintains an interest in the off-campus behavior of its students, to the extent that the behavior reflects upon the reputation and safety of the institution itself. The College, therefore, reserves the right to institute disciplinary action whenever the behavior of a matriculated student off campus results in an arrest and/or conviction for an alleged violation of criminal law regarding illegal drug usage, sale, or manufacture of illegal drugs.

Legal Implications
The College seeks to uphold all local, state, and federal laws regarding illegal substances.

Master of Science Physician Assistant Program | Disciplinary Standards for Students Possessing, Using, Distributing, and/or Selling Drugs and Controlled Substances
The College of Mount Saint Vincent Master of Science Physician Assistant Program has adopted a zero tolerance policy regarding the use of any controlled substance. This includes, but is not limited to, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines (unless prescribed for documented medical conditions, for example, ADHD), and Benzodiazepines.

Students must be aware that there is a significant difference in “decriminalization versus legalization.” Many of our affiliate clinical sites have adopted a similar approach and zero tolerance policy. It is the policy of the program to mirror that requirement. Any student who takes a drug screening examination and tests positive will be subject to disciplinary action by the Professional Conduct Review Committee, with possible dismissal from the College’s program.

Please note: A positive drug conviction will preclude you from receiving your medical license upon graduation. A DWI (driving while intoxicated) conviction may preclude you from receiving your medical license upon graduation or find it difficult to achieve approval by a hospital medical board for privileges to practice. A DUI (driving under the influence) conviction may preclude you from receiving your medical license upon graduation or find it difficult to achieve approval by a hospital medical board for privileges to practice.

An important aspect of professionalism is to report to either class or a clinical clerkship prepared to enthusiastically participate in either didactic or clinical duties. If under the influence of drugs or alcohol this standard will be difficult to meet and may result in possible disciplinary actions being enforced.